prstat – a great tool for process monitoring

Solaris administrators with solid Linux experience are usually installing top on their systems because of convenience. Quite a few administrators are aware of prstat but don't see benefits of using its format which somewhat differs from top. And a really small number of Solaris sysadmins really know how to use the prstat command properly. I consider myself a power user, so won't even be claiming to be a prstat guru, but these command examples will hopefully teach you a thing or two.

 

prstat advantages at glance

I really like prstat because it gives me access to the following information:

  • microstate accounting with LOTS of CPU info
  • CPU usage stats across global and non-global zones
  • provide reports (multiple screens of stats taken at specific intervals) forwarded to a file
  • do really useful summaries about top users consuming your OS resources

Welcome to 2012!

Hi all, happy New Year!

Just thought I’ll take a few minutes to welcome you to the new year and to thank you once again for staying with the Solaris Blog for so long!

My plans for this blog are quite humble in the view of Solaris not being a primary Unix-like OS at work anymore, but I’m still quite curious about a few things and would gladly share knowledge and answer your questions to my best ability.

So far, the following topics appear to be most useful:

  • Anything to do with SSH (stay tuned and take a minute to become RSS reader of my Unix Tutorial blog – I plan on releasing an SSH eBook later this year which many of you will find useful) – yes, it will cover passwordless SSH and will have some of the best X11 forwarding recipes
  • DTrace tips – still my favorite from Solaris 10 times, DTrace is truly amazing. I’m both surprised and glad that it made its way into many other operating systems. If anything, I’ll be sharing occasional tips on DTrace in Mac OSX. I will assume you’ve all seen Brendan Gregg’s excellent DTrace Tools kit!
  • ZFS – this proved to be so useful and revolutionary at the time that ZFS can now be found in a number of appliances and OS distros for NAS storage management (hello ZFS Build, Nexenta and Zena Box!)

I plan to expand sections of the blog covering these topics, but will gladly add anything you may find useful enough to flag in the comments section.

I’m really looking forward to 2012, and hope there will be more than one occasion when you will find my tips useful and readily applicable. Talk soon!

 

Oracle Sends a Strong Message about Sun Microsystems

Really glad to see the address Larry Ellison gave to all the Sun customers on the Oracle website:

  • more money to develop SPARC
  • more money to develop Solaris
  • dramatic improvement in Sun’s hardware performance through tight integration with Oracle software

I’ve seen many comments from existing Sun employees and the message above is seen as both strong and very positive. Hope this brings Sun Microsystems better days, it’s a great company with amazing people.

Share your Solaris OS experience and win a prize!

Just got an email from the Frontline Systems representative about a competition they’re running at the moment.

[Read more…]

Changing hostname in Solaris

I had to change the host name in one of Solaris zones today, and just out of curiousity looked into /etc/init.d/network script. That’s how I learned a new (to me) option of the uname command, which seems to be specific to Solaris: uname -S <newhostname>.

So here’s a very simple procedure for updating the hostname of your Solaris 10 server.

[Read more…]

Solaris 10 patch return codes

Now that some of the systems I have to regularly patch are Solaris 10 ones, I have to get used to the new patch return codes which one can see when applying one of the Sun’s recommended patchsets. It’s similar to the Solaris 8/9 patchset installation codes, but there are more codes added to the list.

[Read more…]

Shared-IP and Exclusive-IP in Non-Global Solaris Zones

Just a few days ago I’ve been busy configuring one of the Solaris 10 zones on a DMZ server, and sure enough I hit one of the most common IP-related issues with non-global zones.

Shared IP configuration for non-global Solaris zones

By default, non-global zones will be configured with a shared IP functionality. What this means is that IP layer configuration and state is shared between the zone you’re creating and the global zone. This usually implies both zones being on the same IP subnet for each given NIC.

Shared IP mode is defined by the following statement in zone configuration:

set ip-type=shared

[Read more…]

Solaris 10 update 7 (5/09) release

Last week yet another update of Solaris 10 OS was released: Solaris 10u7.

What’s new in Solaris 10 update 7?

  • ZFS support when cloning a Solaris zone – quite a useful tool for someone who always copied the files of Solaris zones. I personally did similar cloning myself, but it’s handy that now ZFS cloning is supported in the zoneadm command itself.
  • IPsec – SMF services – Service Management Framework now manages all the necessary IPsec functionality with traditionally thorough approach: interface consistency, restarting anf fault-tracking are all provided. SMF services for IPsec are: ipsec/policy, ipsec/ike, ipsec/manual-key and ipsec/ipsecalgs.
  • SunSSH with OpenSSL PKCS#11 Engine support – this opens way for more optimal use of hardware crypto accelerators.
  • iSCSI Target improvements – greatly improved iSNS (Internet Storage Name Service) support, updates for improved interoperability. Most common iSCSI initiators are now supported
  • NetXen 10-GigE driver – a new NIC driver called ntxn will make it possible to use 10-Gigabit cards on your x86 platform
  • New locale support – greetings go to Kazakhstan and Ukraine which are now fully supported

This isn’t a full list of improvements, so if you’re interested in all the details – please read the official What’s New in Solaris 10 update 7 doc.

Solaris 10 u7 screenshots gallery

I’ve uploaded a few screenshots for you, nothing revolutionary but will still give you an idea if you have never seen Solaris 10 before:

See also:

inetadm – intro

inetadm command is used for observing and managing inetd services in Solaris 10.

If you run this command without any parameters, you’ll simply get a list of all the services it manages along with their current status:

solaris# inetadm
ENABLED   STATE          FMRI
enabled   online         svc:/application/x11/xfs:default
enabled   online         svc:/application/font/stfsloader:default
enabled   offline        svc:/application/print/rfc1179:default
enabled   online         svc:/network/rpc/gss:default
disabled  disabled       svc:/network/rpc/mdcomm:default
disabled  disabled       svc:/network/rpc/meta:default
disabled  disabled       svc:/network/rpc/metamed:default
disabled  disabled       svc:/network/rpc/metamh:default
...

[Read more…]

Interesting Solaris blogs

I wonder if someone would be kind enough to share his most interesting Solaris blogs with me?

Here is a partial list of what I regularly read, maybe you’ll like some of it:

Solaris blogs in Russian

Solaris blogs In English

Well, that seems to be all I read. Surely, there are hundreds more on blogs.sun.com and OpenSolaris.org blogs, so I enjoy opening main pages of these resources now and then just to selectively read the most interesting posts (I also find weekly lists of posts on OpenSolaris to be particularly useful).

If you know an interesting Solaris blog, please share it with me and I’ll update the list above.